An Interesting Take on Matching the Hatch

SHARING IS CARING!
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Stop spending so much time trying to identify the exact bug in or on the water. In the end it seems to be a waste of time.

The article digs into the difference of being good enough vs. being close enough in matching the hatch. It really gives the reader an interesting perspective

photo credit:  Jose Maria Gaitano Jativa

photo credit: Jose Maria Gaitano Jativa

 

From the article:

We all know the stories. Heck we were taught to fly fish right alongside them. A bespectacled trout chaser of yesteryear minutely examines an insect luckily caught in hand streamside. They note the flaxen rump, not straw or golden or even just yellow, but FLAXEN. Two tails, not three, are noted along with a dozen other tiny details. The flybox opens to expose row upon row of fly choices that to the lay flyfisher ALL look identical to the insect in hand. Not our expert though. A finger travels along the row slowly, back, then back again. Brows furrow and a mustache twitches… time passes. The finger stops. A fly is chosen. Not A fly, but THE fly.

Does the story above sound familiar to you? Have you been there? Staring at an insect, then in the flybox, then at the insect, then back to box as if that EXACT insect fly will magically appear… all the while NOT fishing. I have. Whether or not our friend (who somehow looks a lot like Teddy Roosevelt given the description) goes on to actually catch a fish isn’t relevant here. Of course in the story they always do. They have a banner day right alongside fellow fly fishers (read as ‘former friends’) who enjoyed refusal after refusal because they missed that ONE little detail, that ONE special thing about that specific insect. Does this happen? Definitely, and rarely (super large volume hatches are an example). Is it relevant to you? Probably not.

It’s important to note I am not saying the FLY doesn’t matter when trout fly fishing. The fly is tremendously important. We all accept that and pursue it with passion and relish. It’s what makes MonthlyFly.com Match the Hatch fly subscriptions special! The thesis here, in our opinion, is that precise, in depth insect analysis and identification is not necessary for a great day on the water. Relax. Let it go. For the majority of flyfishers it’s just not necessary. As well, we’re not downplaying or disrespecting entomologists their hobby or passion. If you enjoy it, go for it with our respect and gratitude!

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Read the entire article – let us know what you think